The Lowdown on Little Italy

Your Typical Neighbour:  Traditional Italian, Portuguese, Latino or Vietnamese residents mingle with a newer generation of hipsters renting subdivided Victorians, young families who got in before prices went crazy, and well-heeled professionals buying reno’d character homes or renovating for themselves. Euro hipsters who love espresso and soccer. Next-gen Mafioso whose parents have moved to Woodbridge.

What We : An ever-changing collection of top-notch restaurants, live music and Latin dancing opportunities that require no transit or cab fare. Side streets remain quiet and leafy even when College is at its hopping busiest. Portuguese and Italian communities lend a strong flair to the cultural life, with streets closed regularly for processions, festivals and the requisite football World Cup/European Cup madness...

What We Don't: Congestion and a lack of parking. Walking down College Street on a late Saturday night in August can be so busy you may feel like you haven’t made it out the bar’s front door yet. Finding parking and/or making your way home can be slow when streetcars are running both directions with only one lane available.

What's Nearby

The Real Estate Scoop*

Little Italy is composed largely of Victorian inspired semi-detached and row homes, nestled under mature trees on narrow streets. Garages are located most commonly at the rear off of laneways that run parallel between the house-lined streets.

A number of sprawling homes on remain on streets like Palmerston and Dovercourt that drive up the average price numbers on homes for this area. Drive north from College along Palmerston (technically South Annex) to see some of the area’s fancier bits; for a more “typical” streetscape of narrow Victorian semis, try Crawford between Dundas and College. Lack of inventory is having an upward effect on the pricing here in general, as popularity remains steady and availability remains low. Attractively priced not-so-updated homes in the area can still be found at a ‘reasonable’ price, but increasingly these too end up being purchased in a hail of bidding-war bullets.

Long-lingering popularity for the area has led to the erection of a number of new low-to mid-rise condo projects that have made Little Ital-living more attainable for the masses who want to be close to the action; we expect to see more of these along the busy retail focused stretch of College.

HOUSE STATS

2013 2014 2015 2016
AVERAGE PRICE $1,003,192 $1,014,368 $1,056,732 $1,187,128
PRICE: Low-High $525,000-$3,470,000 $562,000-$2,024,000 $568,000-$1,600,000 $760,000-$2,300,000
AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET 21 15 17 14
# OF SALES 80 85 59 54

CONDO STATS

2013 2014 2015 2016
AVERAGE PRICE $531,559 $601,570 $624,811 $671,186
PRICE: Low-High $294,000-$1,300,000 $315,000-$1,230,000 $312,000-$1,500,000 $294,791-$1,380,000
AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET 30 21 24 20
# OF SALES 17 23 14 15



*Data from the Toronto Real Estate Board.

Who Lives Here*

Area: 1km
Population: 13,735

Demographics

Kids: 9%
Visible Minority: 24.3%
Youth: 13%
Average Family Income: $90,448
Seniors: 13%

Education

Lower Education: 21.8%
High Education: 20.6%

Home Ownership

Owned Homes: 47%
Tenanted Homes: 53%



*Statistics compiled from the City of Toronto Well Being Toronto website. Neighbourhood boundaries may not correlate exactly to the boundaries used in this site.

Schools

There are a number of schools nearby, and all of the options will offer fine examples of the multiculturalism that is synonymous with living in Toronto.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Ossington Old Orchard Public School
St. Luke Catholic School
Brock Public School

Transit & Commuting

Rocket options on College, Bathurst and Dundas. Buses on Ossington and Harbord. Drivers are a short jaunt to Gardiner Lakeshore via nearby Bathurst or Dufferin.

About Little Italy

Little Italy is one of the most happening neighbourhoods in this city. With its popular (and delicious) restaurants, cafes, bakeries, clothing stores, shoe boutiques, and retro record shops, and it is no wonder why. With so much to do, at every turn, it is also (surprisingly) one of the more relaxing areas to be. Little Italy puts the “Dolce Far Niente” (Sweet of nothing = sweet idleness) in a city that is always on-the-go.

And how does it do that? Simple: good (great) food, good music (live bands), beautiful shopping options, and friendly faces. Little Italy has some of the most (and the most popular) patios in Toronto. It’s patio-dwelling culture can be attributed to it’s european roots and Italian influence. An influence, that is palatable not only in the mouth-watering tuscan fare, rich espressos, generous capuccinos, creamy agnolotti, and fresh biscotti a-plenty, but in the neighbourhood’s overall tight-knit community atmosphere. An energy that embraces the richer, finer, and “funner” things in life. Yes, we said it: “funner”.

In-line with the european style of the area, surrounding residential side streets (off of College Street) hug visitors with well-manicured lawns, immaculate front porches, beautiful brick homes, waving hands, and friendly faces. The residential makeup of the area varies between the old and young and old-school and new-school.

In tune with the rest of the city, Little Italy’s housing market is in high demand. People who have lived in Little Italy a long time seldom want to leave the convenience, community, and welcoming ‘vibe’ so rare in big-city living behind.

In Little Italy life is sweet and idleness is done right – and done in style.